October 22, 2009

Black Bean Hummus

I’m sorry that I don’t have a photo for you of the hummus, but if you’ve ever eaten or made chickpea traditional hummus, it is a similar consistency with a blue/black color.  Trust me, it is delicious, especially when warmed and served with fresh pita.  YUM!

Black Bean Hummus

  • 16 oz or more black beans (homemade or canned)
  • 1/4 c tahini.
  • Salt
  • Cajun seasoning (I use Tony Chachere's Cajun Seasoning)
  • 3 T. or more Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1-2 cloves garlic

Drain beans but reserve liquid. In food processor, process garlic and add beans and tahini. Keep processor running and add a stream of olive oil. If still a bit chunky, add some of the liquid from the beans to the mixture. Process until smooth. Stop here if serving to toddlers. If not, add seasoning to your desired taste. This dip can be made with warm beans or cold. You can heat after it is prepared if you like it served warm.

3 comments:

  1. Oh, I love black beans!! Yummy.

    I'm allergic to sesame... what might I be able to replace the tahini with?

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  2. I love hummus, and I keep seeing recipes I'd like to try (including this one!) But, they all have tahini in them. Where do you find tahini? The only tahini I've found was organic and very expensive. Got any suggestions?

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  3. SnoWhite--My friend uses peanut butter instead of tahini with great success. She mainly makes traditional chickpea hummus, but finds that it works great and that it is less expensive. You might want to experiment with the amounts to each recipe, but I think that she usually adds the same amount as she would tahini.

    Unfinished Mom--I have found it near the pickles and relishes or in the Middle Eastern/Indian section of your grocery store. Ask your grocer if they carry it. I have found the Joyva brand in a steel tin that was a little less expensive and better tasting than the Krinos brand that is packaged in a jar. You'll pay around $5-$8 for a container of tahini, but it will last you for a long time. Tahini is thick and often has a layer of oil on top. Try to stir it with a fork or knife some before measuring it out (this might be a little difficult after first opening the package but worth the effort).

    Thanks for the great questions! Let us know how your hummus making goes! ;)

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